Broad Coalition of Colorado Business Leaders, Faith Leaders, and Community Groups Issue Statement on U.S. Supreme Court Granting Review of Masterpiece Cakeshop Case

OneColoradoMasterpieceReviewGrantedJune 26, 2017

Today, Freedom for All Coloradans — a broad coalition of Colorado business leaders, faith leaders, and community groups — released the following statement regarding the Supreme Court’s decision to hear the Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. The Court will review a decision from the Colorado Court of Appeals, which found that the Denver-area bakery discriminated against Dave Mullins and Charlie Craig, a same-sex couple, by refusing to sell them a wedding cake.

Amanda Henderson, Executive Director, Interfaith Alliance of Colorado:
“As people of faith from many traditions we are grounded in a common teaching, love your neighbor as you love yourself. In our communities and in our country, all people should have the right to be treated equally under the law, and served in any establishment no matter who they are, what they believe, or who they love.”

Tim Gaudette, Colorado Outreach Manager, Small Business Majority:
“Americans overwhelmingly oppose policies that allow businesses to cite their religious beliefs as an excuse for discriminating against LGBTQ persons, including 65 percent of Colorado small business owners, according to a Small Business Majority scientific opinion poll.”

Laura “Pinky” Reinsch, Political Director, One Colorado:
“All hardworking people, including those who are gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or queer, should be treated fairly and equally under the law. When they walk into a business that’s open to the public, they should be treated like anyone else and not be discriminated against. Let’s be clear, the Masterpiece Cakeshop case is about a business turning customers away simply because they were gay, which violates longstanding Colorado law.

“Freedom of religion is one of our most fundamental rights as Americans, which is why it’s protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution. But that freedom does not give any of us the right to harm other people, to impose our beliefs on others, or to discriminate. As a nation, we decided a long time ago that businesses that are open to the public should be open to everyone on the same terms. Nobody should be turned away from a business, denied service, fired from their job, or evicted from their home simply because of who they are.”